Vietnamese Hoa “beats” Agent Orange

Photo Jan Banning, march 2000. Between 1961 and 1971, US troops sprayed 72 million litres of herbicides over ± 10% of the surface of South Vietnam - 51 million of this was Agent Orange, containing a total of 170 kilos of 2,3,7,8-T4CDD (dioxin). Laboratory tests led to the conclusion that dioxin can lead to birth defects and genetic damage in animals. Vietnamese and other researchers found higher rates of congenitally malformed babies among people who have been sprayed with this defoliant. Cam Lo district (Quang Tri province) just south of the former North-South border is one of the heavily sprayed areas. Le Thi Hoa (left, 14) and her sister Le Thi Nhon (27) are possible victims. Their father Le Huu Dong (57): "Nhon and Hoa have the same problem. People call them monsters, but their brains are normal, they can understand, speak, walk. Hoa is studying at home, she is very intelligent." Dong was a soldier in the South-Vietnamese army (1963-75) and was in close contact with Agent Orange. They had a third child with the same syndrome, who died.

Photo Jan Banning, march 2000.
Between 1961 and 1971, US troops sprayed 72 million litres of herbicides over ± 10% of the surface of South Vietnam – 51 million of this was Agent Orange, containing a total of 170 kilos of 2,3,7,8-T4CDD (dioxin).
Laboratory tests led to the conclusion that dioxin can lead to birth defects and genetic damage in animals. Vietnamese and other researchers found higher rates of congenitally malformed babies among people who have been sprayed with this defoliant.
Cam Lo district (Quang Tri province) just south of the former North-South border is one of the heavily sprayed areas.
Le Thi Hoa (left, 14) and her sister Le Thi Nhon (27) are possible victims. Their father Le Huu Dong (57): “Nhon and Hoa have the same problem. People call them monsters, but their brains are normal, they can understand, speak, walk. Hoa is studying at home, she is very intelligent.” Dong was a soldier in the South-Vietnamese army (1963-75) and was in close contact with Agent Orange. They had a third child with the same syndrome, who died.

 

In 2000, I photographed Le Thi Hoa (left, 14) and her sister Le Thi Nhon (27) – both victims of the use of chemical warfare (Agent Orange) during the Vietnam War. Nowadays, Hoa runs the “Tiny Flower’s Shop & Café.” See this very moving short documentary, assigned by Dutch NGO MCNV (Medisch Comité Nederland-Vietnam).

Their father Le Huu Dong (57) was a soldier in the South-Vietnamese army (1963-75) and was in close contact with Agent Orange. A third child, with the same symptoms, died. In 2000, Dong told me: “Nhon and Hoa have the same problem. People call them monsters, but their brains are normal, they can understand, speak, walk. Hoa is studying at home, she is very intelligent.”

Between 1961 and 1971, US troops sprayed 72 million litres of herbicides over ± 10% of the surface of South Vietnam – 51 million of this was Agent Orange, containing a total of 170 kilos of 2,3,7,8-T4CDD (dioxin).
Laboratory tests led to the conclusion that dioxin can lead to birth defects and genetic damage in animals. Vietnamese and other researchers found higher rates of congenitally malformed babies among people who have been sprayed with this defoliant.

For more of my photos on the consequences of the use of Agent Orange, click here.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Back to Dickson , Malawi, after 10 years – 2

Malawi E 26 597-2

More and more often, she is thinking of the dead she buried. Her husband, who died during the 2002 famine. Eleven of her fifteen children. Nothing can give her joy. Not even dancing with the other women. She only does that to make the children happy. Children shouldn’t notice that you have worries. Marigerita Rafael (65 – in 2005).
I’m going back to the village of Dickson, Malawi, Africa, on thursday, April 23. Will I see Marigerita back? Is she still alive? How about the others I photographed? See One World and De Correspondent later this year.
Our translator’s son, Royd Chifumbi, just wrote me that Marigerita is still alive.

Here, you can see Dickson ten years ago, a typical village of fifty households in the African country of Malawi. Photographed and described, five short years after the United Nations in September 2000 embraced their Millennium Development Goals, of which halving poverty and hunger by the end of 2015 is by far the most important one.

I portrayed them in their largest – usually also the only – room of their mud house. Surrounded by their meagre possessions. Exceptionally poor yet dignified. Journalist Dick Wittenberg described their daily lives. Their plans, their concerns, their shame. Their heroic attempts to lead an ordinary life.

There was a famine in the village at that time. The corn harvest, which was to provide eighty percent of the annual food, had failed due to lack of rain. Daily life showed the essence of everyday poverty: lack of choice, no control over your own existence. Villagers did not have the option to cultivate their own land, so that the following year they would, in any case, have something to eat. Hunger forced them to hunt for food. Villagers with a sick baby could not go to the doctor for lack of money for medicines. A woman did not have the freedom to say ‘no’ to a man. His food supply, however small, would be her salvation.

Publication of text and photographs in the weekend magazine of the leading Dutch newspaper “NRC Handelsblad” garnered a record number (for that newspaper) of 600 letters to the editor. The cover story under the headline “The face of poverty ‘ had touched its readers deeply. A spontaneous fundraiser among those readers raised nearly 80,000 euro. This money was used over a period of five years to support the village; in the form of corn, fertilizer and water pumps. During that period, Dick Wittenberg returned to the village eight times in total. A committee of readers was set up to make sure the money was spent in a meaningful manner.

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Exhibition in Venice during Biennale (May 9 – June 28, 2015)

USA, Jail (run by sheriff Pope), Jackson, GA. Holding cell. Fontana Gallery will exhibit my photography during the 2015 Venice Biennale. The exhibition will open on Saturday 9th May at 11am with a speech by Mario Trevisan, one of Italy’s most important collectors of photography. His Trevisan collection is exhibited in museums such as the Fortuny in Venice and the MART in Rovereto, and contains work by Man Ray, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Margaret Bourke-White, Lee Friedlander, Diane Arbus and Cindy Sherman, among others. The exhibition runs from 9th May to 28th June and takes place at Fontana Gallery, temporarily located in the VeniceInaBottle Gallery, Via Garibaldi, Castello 1794, 30122 Venice (Tel. +31 621578045). Following the opening, drinks will be served at the nearby Casa del Popolo belonging to the Italian communist party PRC (in the Fondamenta della Tana).

Posted in News | Leave a comment

Back to Malawi after 10+ years

Malawi 608-4BWriter Dick Wittenberg and I will go back to the poor African village of Dickson, more than ten years after our first visit – thanks to a grant from the Dutch Postcode Lottery Fund For Journalists, and to the magazines One World and De Correspondent. In 2004, the publication of our text and photographs in leading Dutch newspaper “NRC Handelsblad’s monthly M garnered a record number (for that newspaper) of over 600 letters to the editor. The cover story under the headline “The Face of Poverty ‘ had touched its readers deeply. A spontaneous fundraiser among those readers raised nearly € 80,000. This money was used over a period of five years to support the village; in the form of corn, fertilizer and water pumps.

On April 23 (2015), I will go back to Dickson – just before the expiration of the deadline of the Millennium Development Goals. Halving poverty and hunger by the end of 2015 is by far the most important of those. But again, after a bad harvest, hunger is threatening Malawi. What about Dickson? I will portray its villagers again, surrounded by their possessions. Let’s see if and how much this village has changed. For the photos from 2004, click here

 

Posted in News | Leave a comment

EXTRACTO DE UNA CHARLA CON JAN BANNING: DEL FOTOPERIODISMO A LA FOTOGRAFÍA DOCUMENTAL (Entrevista)

February 11, 2015  rosa.vroom@gmail.com

Una tarde de agosto de 2014, Jan Banning me recibe en su pequeño taller en la calle Begonia del Barrio del Dique del Valle (Utrecht, Holanda). Dentro de un bloque frío, rodeado de naves industriales, este fotógrafo revela y experimenta con sus fotografías. Recuerdo haber aparcado la bicicleta junto a número 23 y estar bastante nerviosa; dos frases frías y distantes al teléfono el día anterior y la falsa perspectiva de que me encontraría la arrogancia más dura del prototipo holandés. Sobre el número del bloque, centenares de botones y logos empresariales, ningún Jan Banning. ‘Hola. ¿Qué tal? Llego tarde y no encuentro la oficina.’ Pero la cálida aceptación del retraso y de la dificultad de encontrarme incluso a mí misma, hacen desaparecer los fantasmas. ‘Pasa. Pasa. ¿Quieres un café?’Los primeros quince minutos de conversación versan sobre mí. Incluso recuerdo haberle enseñado mi, por aquel entonces, nuevo portafolio online. ‘Mira, aquí publicaré la entrevista que haga, si es que no me la publican en otro medio’. Ahora me resulta casi tierno pensar en ello, pensar en que existen tantos profesionales dispuestos a escuchar las dudas, las inquietudes e, incluso, las expectativas de personas como yo. También hablamos de mi padre y su vida en el campo. Resulta que ambos vienen de la misma generación y movida cultural, social y política de la ciudad de Nijmegen.

He hablado con algunas personas del círculo social antes de hacer la entrevista y todas ellas alguna vez se alzaron en las manifestaciones feministas, ocuparon algún que otro edificio o contemplaron el famoso debate entre Chomsky y Foucault por televisión. Quizás por eso el poder del Estado se convierte en el tema preferido de este autor. Y es que sus inquietudes casi siempre le llevan a buscar el micro-relato de temas de importancia global: la burocracia a través ‘Bureaucratics’ donde hace una exploración estética para tratar los puntos en común de los funcionarios en países como Bolivia, China, Francia, India, Liberia, Rusia, los EEUU o Yemen-; o las consecuencias de la Segunda Guerra Mundial en ‘Confort Women’ sobre la prostitución forzada de cientos de mujeres indonesias por el ejército japonés o ‘Traces of War: Survivors of the Burma and Sumatra Railways’ sobre la explotación de trabajadores en el Sureste de Asia durante el mismo periodo. Su técnica preferida; el retrato.

Intuyo que el hecho de que haya venido hasta su oficina le devuelven con nostalgia o orgullo, o las dos cosas a la vez, el pasado. Jan Banning es cariñoso y conversador, y conmigo, descubre que el carácter cálido funciona. Me relajo. Pero ‘¿quién estaba haciendo la entrevista?’ Y después prometerme una futura visita a la granja en Las Alpujarras granadinas: ‘Punto. Tengo una cita para cenar con alguien. Sólo tienes un rato para las preguntas’

Tengo que admitir que para esta entrevista, el invento micrófono-móvil, tampoco tuvo éxito. Pero he podido rescatar gran parte de la grabación y ahora tengo dudas sobre si realmente Jan Banning llegara puntual a su cita de ese día. Quizás sintió la necesidad de explicarme muchas cosas, sobre él y su trabajo, pero también sobre la conceptualización actual de las creaciones artísticas y/o periodísticas.


¿Cómo influye tu trayectoria periodística en tu trabajo como fotógrafo documental?

He aprendido a trabajar con profundidad, investigar con profundidad y divisar y analizar las fuentes que son importantes. Eso es algo que puede hacer muy bien el periodismo. De hecho tengo colegas de historia que han acabado haciendo periodismo. Pero es algo que yo extraigo de las ciencias históricas. La manera en la que yo lo veo es la siguiente. En realidad todos los temas que yo escojo son temas sociales o políticos. Sin tener una intención propagandística, quiero que se abra un debate social. Y para ello creo necesario saber de qué va la cosa. Aunque escriba poco sobre ello, más que unas frases, cuando me preguntan quiero saber qué es lo que sucede, de qué va. También soy curioso y quiero saber más del tema.


Tus trabajos tienen investigación y no tienen ficción. No hay trucos.

Eso es casi cierto del todo. En ‘National Identities’ hice un trabajo exclusivo de estudio.


Bueno, mejor soy directa. No entiendo qué se entiende en general por fotografía documental.

Y eso no lo vas a descubrir nunca porque no es un concepto claro. Es un concepto muy diluido. Por ejemplo, mira la lista de los premios Dutch DOC en Holanda… eso cojea por todos los lados. En realidad todo el concepto de fotografía documental se ha vuelto tan difuso que ya ni se puede utilizar.

Cada año inventan un concepto que al año siguiente ya no abarca determinadas tendencias y así continuamente. Y creo que la fotografía documental es un concepto que ha entrado en una fase de declive. Quizás podrías ver la fotografía documental como el equivalente del periodismo de investigación en el mundo del periodismo escrito. Es que cuando uno utiliza el término fotografía documental, nadie entiende bien a lo que te refieres. Cada uno tiene que describir detalladamente qué es lo que quiere decir con el término.

Una vez traté de hacer una definición, no la recuerdo muy bien, pero era algo así como… “A través de una investigación profunda, se realiza un trabajo fotográfico que muestra una información relevante, que trata temas sociales y políticos”. Me lo saco ahora mismo un poco de la manga pero va en esa dirección. Documentas, registras, algo de importancia social.

ES QUE CUANDO UNO UTILIZA EL TÉRMINO FOTOGRAFÍA DOCUMENTAL, NADIE ENTIENDE BIEN A LO QUE TE REFIERES”

¿La fotografía documental tiene que obligatoriamente producir un cambio para bien?

No me malinterpretes, eso es mi definición. Si miras al Dutch DOC hay trabajos que no van a cambiar absolutamente nada; artistas comerciales enfocados a la galería, que son estéticos pero que no cambian nada. Pero yo sí quiero que mis proyectos cambien algo. Por eso me informo bien.

Por ejemplo, en mi proyecto “Law & Order”, que trata los castigos en las cárceles norteamericanas, trato de investigar por qué castigamos y encerramos a los culpables en cárceles y qué queremos con ello. ¿Queremos venganza? Pues bien, los encerramos y los dejamos siempre bien ataditos. Pero en EEUU las cárceles las denominan power of correction. ¿Por qué corrección? ¿Corregimos algo con encerrarlos? ¿Cómo nos movemos con eso? Veo también, por ejemplo, que la política hace un uso propagandístico de la inseguridad de las personas. El ‘ya no puede ir uno seguro por la calle’ es falso.. Si uno mira las estadísticas, hay muchísima menos violencia que hace algunos años…Y más o menos ya conozco el proceso: publicas un libro, abres una exposición y te entrevistan y no puedes estar contando vanidades.


Pero es yo lo considero periodismo… profundizar en la actualidad para crear un debate social.

Que sí, pero yo hablo del medio. Puede tener un fondo periodístico, pero también es arte. Mira por ejemplo, los grabados de Goya. Mira a un poeta como Shelley, que se involucró completamente en la política. Hay muchísimos ejemplos de arte y debate social. Y eso es lo que me interesa.


Entonces en esa combinación de estética y denuncia social… ¿te ganas el sueldo?

Me gano el dinero sobre todo como artista. Esto quiere decir que las impresiones de mis fotografías se venden y por un precio considerable, entre los 4.000 y 13.000 euros. No vendo todos los días pero es lo que más me aporta. En segundo lugar, de las exposiciones, y en tercer y último lugar, de las ganancias del periodismo. Hace quince años sí ganaba muchísimo más del periodismo, pero ahora hay muchísimo menos dinero para los periodistas freelance. Ahora utilizo el periodismo de otra manera. Antes cuando encontraba un tema quería publicarlo de forma inmmediata y que llegara al mayor número de personas posibles. Digamos que en 1999, cubría mi evento y rápidamente me dirigía al periódico. Ahora no.

Pongo como ejemplo el proyecto ‘Law & Order‘. De forma excepcional publiqué este trabajo en la edición alemana de Geo y en la internacional, sin que estuviera totalmente acabado.  La razón de esto fue que me pagaron bien y necesitaba el dinero. Pero eso no es el proceso normal, normalmente espero a que el periodismo me sirva para promover la obra. Ahora este proyecto está retenido y planeo publicar un libro y hacer una exposición en primavera. Después de que suceda esto, sigo publicando en los medios. El hecho de publicarlo, no es tanto para ganar dinero (aunque intento hacerlo) sino que forma parte de una estrategia más amplia que incluye exposición, libro y publicaciones para encender el debate sobre el tema que trato. Eso quiere significa a veces que, por ejemplo, sí que quiero que me publiquen en Holanda, pero no en Escandinavia porque la exposición no va a salir hasta dentro de un año o medio año a Suiza y espero con publicar. La idea es que todos los medios provoquen algo.

“HAY TANTAS FOTOGRAFÍAS QUE NO APORTAN NADA… ¿ENTONCES EN QUÉ SE CONVIERTEN? EN UN DECORADO CÍNICO DE LA REALIDAD EN EL PERIÓDICO-BUENO”

 ¿En qué momento de tu carrera decidiste cambiar de perspectiva?

Realicé ‘Traces of War: Survivors of the Burma and Sumatra Railways’ en ese momento de transición de un trabajo periodístico a un trabajo documental. Antes de este trabajo publiqué un libro sobre Vietnam, en una parte de este libro una de mis preguntas fue qué pasó en Vietnam después de la guerra: ¿hubo un proceso de ajusticiamiento? Podrías explicar el relato que yo contaba en este libro, de una forma muy corta, como lo hice a principios de los noventa: una mirada hacia atrás de una guerra vencida, pero una justicia prohibida. Así podrías decirlo de forma muy simple. Pero yo quería ir a más. Eso sí, ahora, con sesenta años, estoy aprendiendo a priorizar los temas, qué es lo que realmente merece la pena. Qué no está hecho aún. (…)

Ahora estoy fotografiando a los comunistas en distintos países, y eso me parece importante porque señala a una alternativa al libre mercado, indica la existencia de un movimiento social. Creo que es el final y el comienzo de otra forma de pensar. Personalmente no soy comunista, pero me parece interesante que sigan existiendo restos de aquello y me permita abrir un debate.


¿Este nuevo trabajo sobre el comunismo es similar a ‘Bureaucratics’?

No son retratos, en realidad estoy intentando mostrar los espacios simbólicos: sus oficinas y quiénes trabajan allí: ¿son todos viejos o hay gente joven también? ¿Qué hacen esas personas en su entorno? ¿Qué aspecto tienen? En el partido comunista italiano me sorprendió ver a muchos jóvenes sentados bajo los cuadros y figuras de Mao y Stalin. Entiendo que se crea en las palabras de Marx, muchas facciones radicales en Holanda también lo hacen, pero ¿Stalin, Mao?

(…) Esto es lo que realmente me gusta y eso no lo tiene el periodismo. Veo muchas veces que en el fotoperiodismo se utilizan demasiados clichés. Jugar con el cliché… no, ni siquiera eso. Cuando hay un levantamiento en Egipto, tienes que ver a hombres gritando en la plaza. Si hay guerra en Siria, hay que ver hombres con armas o mujeres que lloran. En realidad creo que el fotoperiodismo nos dice algo que en realidad ya sabemos, con algunos acontecimientos más. Pero no se nos induce a reflexionar, nos ofrecen lo que esperamos. Y eso es precisamente la diferencia entre lo que yo busco y trabajo y el periodismo. Con mi trabajo yo quiero confusión, diferentes niveles de entendimiento, para instar a la gente a pensar. Eso me parece mucho más interesante que un statement propagandístico de así es como lo tienes que ver, así es como tienes que pensar.

“ME SORPRENDIÓ VER A MUCHOS JÓVENES SENTADOS BAJO LOS CUADROS Y FIGURAS DE MAO Y STALIN EN ITALIA.”

Y no lo pienso tanto del periodismo escrito, pero sí del fotoperiodismo. Todas las fotografías han pasado a formar parte de un gran tejido simbólico; las fotografías de Siria o de Túnez…Una fotografía te remite a otra, pero no nos lleva a pensar. Creo que la fotografía no sólo tiene que llegar a lo emocional, también tiene que llevar a lo racional, eso es lo enriquecedor.


Pero… A veces esas fotografías son importantes para la opinión pública. Por ejemplo, la fotografía de la niña del napalm de Nick Ut.

Sí, indudablemente tuvo un impacto. A lo que me refiero es que un año gana la fotografía tal en el Worldpressphoto, y al año siguiente, veinte fotógrafos intentan hacer exactamente la misma fotografía en otro lugar. Sí, realmente una fotografía muy directa puede tener mucho impacto, pero hay tantas fotografías que no aportan nada… ¿Entonces en qué se convierten esas fotografías? En un decorado cínico de la realidad en el periódico-bueno. Bueno, eso también ha sonado muy cínico… Atrae la atención a la historia en cuestión, pero en sí misma no aporta nada. También es como tiene que funcionar, ¿no? Abres una revista, y boom, se te golpea con una fotografía sensacional y sientes la necesidad de leer el artículo.


¿Me podrías hablar un poco más de tu técnica en los retratos?

Siempre procuro que los ojos de mis retratados estén muy iluminados. Para las fotografías de ‘Comfort Women’ utilicé una sola luz casi por encima de la lente porque quería utilizar un tipo de luz neutral. De esta manera conseguía, como fotógrafo, estar fuera del relato. El relato de estas mujeres es un relato muy dramático y pensé: “quiero que el drama que salga de estas mujeres sea exclusivamente su drama, no un drama que yo como fotógrafo genero con mucho efecto y retoque”. Quería permanecer muy neutral como fotógrafo, detrás de la mirilla.Y una de las maneras de conseguirlo fue así. Además, como la luz les caía de frente reflejaba mucho. Así también conseguí fue el halo azul dentro de los ojos, por la edad de estas mujeres.


¿Qué importancia tiene para ti el pie de foto?

Por un lado, veo que hay coleccionistas que compran ese cuadro y lo cuelgan en la pared. Allí no hay texto, sólo foto. Una de mis fotografías, por ejemplo, se colgó en la recepción de un edificio importante. La gente que trabajaba junto a la fotografía, conocía la historia detrás y siempre la contaban. Eso me parece muy interesante y lo que saqué en conclusión de aquí es que, en primer lugar, las fotografías tienen un impacto por sí mismas lo suficientemente grande para que las personas reaccionen. En segundo lugar las fotógrafías son capaces de que las  personas tengan el interés de saber algo más: el texto. Un buen retrato tiene una fuerza independiente que crea fascinación. Pero personalmente creo que los retratos son una parte de, digamos, un documental completo.

Casi siempre los retratos se hacen después de una conversación intensa. En el caso de ‘Comfort Women’ siempre era después de una conversación sobre sus vidas. Aunque lo curioso es que la fotografía más importante de la colección es de una mujer con la que conversé después de hacer el retrato. Pero esa mujer sí sabía que yo estaba allí para fotografiar a las ‘comfort women’ y ella misma propuso ser fotografiada. “Yo también fui ‘comfort woman’, ¡yo también quiero ser fotografiada!” me dijo enfurecida. Es decir, el contexto determinó que saliera esa fotografía. No es que ella pensara, “estoy tan bonita hoy con mi nuevo gorrito que quiero que ese hombre me haga la fotografía”. La atmósfera de los retratos es consecuencia de la atmósfera real que creé.


¿Qué te parece más interesante de tu trabajo: investigar el tema o investigar la estética del tema?

Las dos cosas me gustan por igual. En el caso de  ‘Traces of War: Survivors of the Burma and Sumatra Railways’ fue muy importante para mí saberlo todo, obviamente para escribir los textos también, pero también para poder conversar con ellos. Porque…¿con qué problema te puedes encontrar? Muchas veces no hablan. Entonces te planteas ‘¿y por dónde empiezo? Llegó un momento en que en las conversaciones mismas me decían cosas como ‘el lugar ese, el hombre ese, ¿lo recuerdas?’. Me sabía tan bien la historia que se pensaban que yo había estado allí. Esa confianza jugó un rol muy importante. Así conseguí hacer las fotografías. Pero en este libro también investigué mucho sobre el cómo iba a retratarlos. Sí, haces una entrevista y lo acompañas con una fotografía. Sí, se puede, pero eso no es fotografía es ilustración.

Antes de tomar la decisión de empezar a fotografiar me replanteé de nuevo de qué iba el proyecto. ‘El proyecto va del pasado pero lo importante es qué influencia ha tenido éste sobre el resto de tu vida.’ Y pensé: “¿y si fotografío a estos señores como se hacía antes…?” Por eso saqué los torsos desnudos. Y aunque tengan ochenta o noventa años, visualmente se consigue ese puente con el pasado. Hombres en el presente pero vestidos, o más bien desvestidos, como en 1943. (…) En cuanto a la investigación estética de “Confort Women”se puede decir que fue la versión femenina de “Traces of War: Survivors of the Burma and Sumatra Railways”. No iba a decirles a las mujeres que se quitaran las camisetas, ¿no? Investigué e investigué hasta encontrar la solución estética que respetara el contenido. En definitiva, ambas facetas me parecen muy interesantes.

La entrevista está a punto de concluir. Jan Banning recibe una llamada  y es el momento de decirle qué es lo que he pensado para acompañar la entrada de este blog (que quizás sea publicada en otro medio de comunicación). ‘¿Te gustaría hacerme un retrato?’ ‘Necesitaría horas para hacerlo, tendrías que venir otro día’. Con esa promesa me quedo y me monto en la bicicleta satisfecha pensando en esa segunda cita, quizás con una nueva grabadora.

Rosa Vroom: http://rosavroom.com/extracto-de-una-charla-con-jan-banning-del-fotoperiodismo-a-la-fotografia-documental/

Posted in News, Uncategorized | Leave a comment